Without a Front – The Warrior’s Challenge (Chronicles of Alsea – Book #3) by Fletcher DeLancey

Rated 5.00 out of 5 based on 3 customer ratings
(3 customer reviews)

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Book Three in the Chronicles of Alsea

Author: Fletcher DeLancey

Description

Lancer Andira Tal made Alsean history when she accepted the producer’s challenge to work a holding as a field laborer. She should have known that the peace of Hol-Opah couldn’t last. Now her hosts are cleaning up blast debris and she’s searching for both a traitor and a missing member of her family.

Just as she thinks she’s solved one of her problems, Tal falls into a meticulously planned trap that threatens her title, her new family, and her freedom. To top it all, she loses her greatest support right when she needs it most. There’s no possible way out, so she’ll have to do the impossible—and the clock is ticking.

Additional information

Publication Date

November 2015

Formats

epub, mobi, and pdf

Edition

1st

Length

140,000 words

Language

English

ISBNs

978-3-95533-441-3 (mobi), 978-3-95533-442-0 (epub), 978-3-95533-443-7 (pdf)

Publisher

Ylva Publishing

3 reviews for Without a Front – The Warrior’s Challenge (Chronicles of Alsea – Book #3) by Fletcher DeLancey

  1. Simon Gorton
    Rated 5 out of 5

    (verified owner):

    The final part in the trilogy. Please do not start here as it won’t make much sense as a stand-alone book.
    I loved the story as it is so unlike others of this genre. There is little space tech, the story revolves around the battle for power and money. The characters are well drawn, but over some paragraphs. It is a great way of challenging preconceptions as I discovered several characters that I had assumed to be male were then described as ‘she’.
    I read all three books over a couple of weeks and could not put them down. I just wish there was a fourth!

  2. Tara at The Lesbian Review
    Rated 5 out of 5

    :

    It feels a bit odd reviewing this one on its own. The book doesn’t stand alone at all because it directly picks up where Without A Front – The Producer’s Challenge leaves off. If you haven’t read that book, this review will have a bunch of spoilers.

    Tal managed to save Salomen from the assassination attempt at the end of The Producer’s Challenge and now she’s in the hospital with burns over much of her body. Their tyree bond has been forged for survival reasons rather than love, but Tal and Salomen are drawing strength from each other as they grapple with the fact that someone tried to kill Tal.

    As they hide the true nature of their relationship from the world and the degree to which Tal has been injured, they have some hard truths to deal with–not only does someone want Tal dead, but Salomen’s brother helped the assassin know where she would be. It also becomes clear that there’s corruption deep within the Council and a faction that wants Tal overthrown.

    Unsurprisingly, I loved The Warrior’s Challenge. The romance that began in The Producer’s Challenge continues strongly and is satisfying, there’s tons of action, and the intrigue around the Council corruption was handled well. Also, let’s just say that the author made up for the lack of sex in the first two books, and how.

    Salomen and Tal continue to be great. The tension that ran between them in The Producer’s Challenge isn’t there in quite the same way, but I particularly enjoyed seeing them negotiate their new life together. I also loved Vellmar the Blade. She’s the perfect sidekick for Tal and I can’t wait to read her novella. Micah had his own journey that is excellent and the big reveal about his backstory totally surprised me, but worked well.

    If you’ve liked the other books in this series, you’ll like this one. I’m looking forward to seeing what else Fletcher DeLancey has for us in the Chronicles of Alsea.

  3. Lee Koven
    Rated 5 out of 5

    :

    Andira Tal is recovering from an attempt on her life with her new love by her side when the machinations against her finally bear fruit. Her resources are depleted, and she has very little time to counter the threat. Can she get out of this mess with her job, her family, and her life intact?
    DeLancey has given a ton of attention to detail in the world and plot. I felt Alsea as very real and cohesive, and the plot is complex but not difficult to understand. The action scenes are easy to follow, and so are the foreign-to-me celebrations and traditions we see.
    The love story has some credible conflict and two incredible women, and the familial and friendship relationships are rich and believable. Andira’s lady shows incredible resolve and strength while remaining human. She grows to assert herself even more in this book, and that makes Andira grow and change for the better in response.
    Some of the issues highlighted in the first book felt like a distant memory here. I wanted to know the status of the named asylum seekers and troubled veterans, since I’d grown to care about them and I thought they were situations that still needed more addressing. Perhaps that will come up in further books.

    I received a review copy, but also borrowed this book from the library for the time it took me to read it. Almost everything gets wrapped up in this novel, after three long books! The couple and memorable secondary characters each get their deserved resolution or at least a break after so many exhausting trials. I’m curious to know what will be next for the world of Alsea- I look forward to reading about the further adventures of several intriguing characters. I’m no television buff, but I believe that these books would translate well to a miniseries. Someone pick up that option!

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