Fragile by Eve Francis

Fragile by Eve Francis

3.33 out of 5 based on 3 customer ratings
(3 customer reviews)

$9.99 / E-BOOK

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Read an excerpt here: pdf | epub

Author: Eve Francis

At twenty-four, college graduate Carly Rogers finds herself still living with her cold and distant mother and her teenage half-sister, Cynthia. As Carly moves from one minimum wage job to another, she reads books alone in her room, reconnects with her best friend, Landon, and takes care of her great aunt Dorothy on the weekends. Her life is quiet and nonthreatening – until she meets Ashley at her new job.

Ashley is a fun, energetic, and intelligent woman who has been forced to leave her old life behind due to a medical condition. Through work, and the start of their own book club, each shares her past and her hopes for the future. When change comes, Carly is forced to make a decision. Does she stay where she thought she always belonged, or strive for something better? Is it possible for her and Ashley to build a new life without feeling like the fragile creatures everyone thinks they are?

Publication Date

February 2016

Formats

epub, mobi, and pdf

Edition

1st

Length

103,000 words

Language

English

ISBNs

978-3-95533-483-3 (mobi), 978-3-95533-484-0 (epub), 978-3-95533-485-7 (pdf)

Publisher

Ylva Publishing

3 reviews for Fragile by Eve Francis

  1. Ameliah Faith
    5 out of 5

    :

    Ordinary People…or are they?
    Carly is a 24 yr old who is going through a quarter life crisis. She moved out of her mom’s house to go to college only to find her English degree isn’t usable with the economy as it is. She has had to move back in with her mother and get a job at Marshall’s. While at her new job she meets Ashley. Ashley loves books almost as much as Carly and the two of them form a book club with just the two of them. This is a story about their relationship with each other and their families.

    This book is not flashy or glamorous. Its not mysterious or even erotic. This story is just a story, nothing special or so I thought but I was VERY wrong!! Its like nothing I’ve read before and I truly enjoyed it a great deal. It is a quiet and genuine and sweet. I had stopped reading it for a few hours and the story snuck up on me. I found myself wondering where the tale would go. What was Ashley’s secret, was Carly mature enough to grow and take control of her own life instead of just letting it happen​? Do they have a future together? The characters are so real with their everyday problems that even at twice Carly’s age I could relate to what she is going through. My own daughter reminds me so much of Carly’s younger sister Cyn and some of her friends face the same challenges as Landon. I grew quite fond of this book and am very, very glad I gave it a go!

  2. Philippa Black
    3 out of 5

    :

    *Note: I was provided with a free copy of the book by Ylva Publishing in exchange for a fair review

    To be completely honest, I almost gave up on reading “Fragile” by Eve Francis. The first chapter has clumsy prose and stilted dialogue, but at the very end of the chapter it makes an allusion to Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot.” So I decided to power through and finish it, and I’m glad I did. While its writing style is less sophisticated than I would prefer, “Fragile” engages with themes that are relevant to both the LGBTQIA community and millennials.

    What do you do when you’re twenty-four, a college graduate, and have moved back in with your mom and little sister? That’s what Carly Rogers is trying to figure out. It’s a common story for millennials, and Francis seems to be intimately acquainted with it. The intriguing part of this novel is not necessarily the plot, but the interactions between characters. Carly has a close relationship with a trans man, a teenage sister with a rebellious streak, a young woman with a seizure disorder, and an older woman who is perhaps asexual. Each person brings something valuable to Carly’s life and helps her in their own way (and vice versa). I particularly enjoyed the fact that Carly’s best friend is a trans man and that issues of the trans community are introduced, as I haven’t read a lesbian novel before that’s done that.

    Overall, the representation “Fragile” presents is important, not just of millennials and lesbians, but of trans people and asexuals as well. However, I probably won’t read it again due to its lack of polish.

  3. Linnea
    2 out of 5

    :

    I was disappointed with this book due to its poor style. It reads as though it were written by a teenager.

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